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Windows: Win8 System Backup; Recovery/EFI Partition(???)

Discussion in 'Operating Systems' started by David Macdonald Ajang, Jun 6, 2014.

  1. David Macdonald Ajang

    David Macdonald Ajang Well-Known Member

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    I recently purchased new Acer laptop with Win8 installed. I was planning to make a system backup with my Acronis True Image Live DVD. The reason is the same as the reason I made Win7 system backups for my previous laptop and desktop PC. I want install some software which require online activation and can only be installed up 3 PCs. After restoring the backup, the activation is preserved so I'm saved from the hassle of contacting technical support over activation issues. I've never seen or dealt with Recovery Partition and EFI system partition before on my Win7 PC as I reformat and installed the OS myself.

    This is my question:
    1. If I go ahead with the backup process, will everything boot and run normally after restoring the new backup to the system partition (C:\) with Acronis? I'm concerned if it is affected by the EFI partition.
    2. What exactly is a Recovery Partition? Some soft of system backup made by OEM? Is there a way to delete the Recovery Partition?
    3. Are there any consequences for attempting to delete the EFI partition as well?
     
  2. Djolovicl

    Djolovicl eTeknix Janitor Forum Mod

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    I don't know much, but what i do know i will share. I apologize in advance if some of this info turns out to be false.

    1. I was able to backup and restore both Win 7 and Win 8.1 installed on UEFI partitioned HDD's. When recoviring them i only recovered actual Windows partition and left the other two untouched.
    2. System Reserved partition holds the boot files & repair tools (check: System Recovery Options - Boot to in Windows 8). Computer boot to this partition first, and then hand off to the Windows partition, so trying to delete it could and probably will screw up your OS aka it wont be able to boot normally.
    3. Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI) - It's technically an upgrade to the BIOS, it is now a standard and it allows you to upgrade firmware on other devices like Video Cards and such.

    If you really don't like those you can always reformat your disk using MBR standard, and installing windows. But then the advantages of the UEFI will not be available. Of course, if you are installing it on a HDD larger than 3TB you will have to stick to GPT standard.

    P.S. There was A LOT of talk on the internet in the last... well almost a decade, about MBR, GPT, EFI and UEFI, Recovery partitions, etc. Just Googlin any of those will provide you with enough info to last you two lifetimes.
     

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